Too Cool for School

Public School Compared to Homeschool

Sophomores in a World History class complete a project on their IPads. They will present in front of the class when the project is completed.

Kaitlyn Barrington

Sophomores in a World History class complete a project on their IPads. They will present in front of the class when the project is completed.

Staring up at the clock, willing for the hands to tick faster, I long to go home. Five days a week, I go through the same routine, go to the same building and see the same people.  Meanwhile, my friend Sarah finished her school day at 10:30 a.m. Sometimes, it doesn’t seem fair.

Sarah has already worked out, read a book and made dinner. The only workout I acquire through the day is trudging up and down the stairs. Sarah always has a more productive day than I do. The way she describes her life is so glamorous. My life appeared so dull, but I found out the truth.

Even though Sarah is homeschooled and has the privilege of staying home, I have the privilege of leaving my house and going to school.  By going to public school, students learn valuable life skills. These don’t come from classes but from the environment we are placed in.  From the time I began school, I have been put in situations out of my comfort zone.  

I learned how to communicate with a large group of people and describe my thoughts clearly”

— Kaitlyn Barrington

In public school, I am required to take a speech class. Through this class, I learned how to communicate with a large group of people and describe my thoughts clearly. There are other project-based classes which require presentations in front of my peers. For example, another place to develop communication skills is the cafeteria. Even if I do not know anyone, I have to find someone to sit by and talk to. In fact, this intimidating experience has helped me meet my best friends.

On the other hand, Sarah also acquires communication skills. However, Sarah puts forth more effort to do so. While at home, she only has her parents and siblings to talk to. In order to make friends, she has to join a variety of homeschool groups or attend church. When I learned how difficult she worked to meet people, I realized how grateful I was to be put into a social environment.

Another difference I have learned between us is that she has a myriad of hobbies, whereas I have three. Since Sarah finishes school early in the afternoon, she spends the rest of her day painting, reading, learning instruments or playing a sport. Eight hours of my day takes place in school, so in order for me to expand my interests, I take elective classes. While classes such as art, culinary, athletics or journalism offer a time to practice hobbies, I do not have the same freedom in expanding my skills as Sarah does. I am limited to forty-five minutes a day to practice a hobby, although, I do have a selection of skilled teachers to push me to be the best I can.

As I continue to count down the minutes until school lets out, I have realized that my life in public school is pretty awesome. Even though I envy Sarah a tiny bit, I love the life I live and would not change a thing. I love the late-night homework jam sessions. I love seeing my friends every day and I love the extracurricular activities offered to me.